3 Cool AI Projects

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Are you ready for AI and machine learning? Here’s an overview of three use cases to give you a flavor of just what is possible.

AI is all around us, quietly working in the background or interacting with us via a number of different devices. Various industries are using AI for specific reasons such as ensuring that flights arrive on time or irrigating fields better and more economically.

Over time, our interactions with AI are becoming more sophisticated. In fact, in the not-too-distant future we’ll have personal digital assistants that know more about us than we know about ourselves.

For now, there are countless AI projects popping up in commercial, industrial and academic settings. Following are a few examples of projects with an extra cool factor.

Get Credit. Now.

Who among us hasn’t sat in a car dealership, waiting for the finance person to run a credit check and provide us with financing options? We’ve also stood in lines at stores, filling out credit applications, much to the dismay of those standing behind us in line. Experian DataLabs is working to change all that.

Experian created Experian DataLabs to experiment with the help of clients and partners. Located in San Diego, London, and Sao Paulo, Experian DataLabs employ scientists and software engineers, 70% of whom are Ph.Ds. Most of these professionals have backgrounds in machine learning.

“We’re going into the mobile market where we’re pulling together data, mobile, and some analytics work,” said Eric Haller, EVP of Experian’s Global DataLabs. “It’s cutting-edge machine learning which will allow for instant credit on your phone instead of applying for credit at the cash register.”

That goes for getting credit at car dealerships, too. Simply text a code to the car manufacturer and get the credit you need using your smartphone. Experian DataLabs is also combining the idea with Google Home, so you can shop for a car, and when you find one you like, you can ask Google Home for instant credit.

There’s no commercial product available yet, but a pilot will begin this summer.

Read the source article at Information Week.