New technique wipes out unwanted data

477

Machine learning systems are everywhere. They predict the weather, forecast earthquakes, provide recommendations based on the books and movies we like, and even apply the brakes on our cars when we’re not paying attention. To do this, software programs in these systems calculate predictive relationships from massive amounts of data. Two researchers have developed a way to do it faster and more effectively than can be done using current methods.

To do this, software programs in these systems calculate predictive relationships from massive amounts of data. The systems identify these predictive relationships using advanced algorithms — a set of rules for solving math problems — and “training data.” This data is then used to construct the models and features that enable a system to determine the latest best-seller you wish to read or to predict the likelihood of rain next week.

This intricate process means that a piece of raw data often goes through a series of computations in a system. The computations and information derived by the system from that data together form a complex propagation network called the data’s “lineage.” The term was coined by Yinzhi Cao, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering, and his colleague, Junfeng Yang of Columbia University, who are pioneering a novel approach to make learning systems forget.

Read the source article at ScienceDaily