Internet Privacy 2017: Expect No Privacy, Intelligence Layers Coming

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There has never been a reasonable expectation of online privacy, and there never will be. Regardless of what you may have recently heard about joint resolutions or nullifications, nothing has changed. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have always had the right to use your data as they see fit, within a few Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) parameters. This has not changed. And you have given FANG (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google) the right to use your data as they see fit (with a few privacy policy exceptions and within the few aforementioned FTC and FCC parameters). So regarding online privacy, for all practical purposes, absolutely nothing has changed.

What About S.J.Res.34?
Yes, the president is expected to sign S.J.Res.34, a joint resolution that nullifies the FCC’s “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” rule. But the FCC rule never went into effect. So net/net, nothing has changed.

What Does This Mean?
One side will tell you that the FCC rule was overly burdensome for ISPs because they would have had to obtain opt-in permission from each customer to use the customers’ data.

The other side will tell you that the FCC rule was absolutely necessary because ISPs have access to 100 percent of your online activity while FANG can only see what you do on their respective sites.

Most of the explanations from elected leaders failed to mention that you pay hard currency to your ISP for access to the Internet. Therefore, you would expect some privacy options (even if those options were offered at a premium price).

On the other hand, you pay for Facebook and Google with your data, so as the cliché goes, “YOU are the product,” and you should not have any expectation of privacy (other than what’s written in the user license agreement or Privacy Policy of the respective sites). As for Amazon and Netflix, you pay with both cash and data. But you can rest easy. Both Amazon and Netflix only use your data internally. While they offer insights to certain vendors, sponsors, and suppliers, the amount of actual data they make available to 2nd or 3rd parties is negligible.

Read the source article at Wearables.